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‘Dear Esther’: Landmark Edition is Currently Free on Steam

‘Dear Esther’: Landmark Edition is currently free on Steam. The game celebrated its tenth anniversary.

“Abandoning traditional gameplay for a pure story-driven experience, Dear Esther fuses its beautiful environments with a breathtaking soundtrack to tell a powerful story of love, loss, guilt, and redemption,” reads the game’s Steam page.

It was first released in 2012 and was famously known as a mod for Half-Life 2. The first-person narrative-driven game sees players exploring a scenic island in the Scottish Hebrides, while the narrator details letters written to his deceased wife uncovering the mystery of her death.

Pc players can download the game at 7.99€. Dear Esther is also free of charge for February 14 and d15.”10 years ago this week Dear Esther was released. To celebrate, PC version is now FREE for 48 hours! Maybe you can offer it to someone special,” wrote developers.

Dear Esther was one of the first games to bring the walking simulator genre to the forefront of the games industry. Without this title, we likely wouldn’t have titles like Firewatch

Pinchbeck the owner of the Chinese room said “I don’t spend a lot of time looking back,” Pinchbeck continued. “It’s been quite funny coming around to ten years, it’s been one of the only times I’ve really looked back and gone ‘Oh, yeah. You almost forget you made it.”

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The game was revolutionary back when it was released in 2012, and changed the way of how the games industry thought about storytelling, becoming a modern classic.

The producers are also releasing another game after 2 weeks Little ocherous.it is centered on the Earth, inspired by old movies like Sinbad and The Land that Time Forgot. Little Orpheus hits PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, Steam, Epic Games Store, and Nintendo Switch on March 1, 2022.

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